Incorrect scores were issued to more than 500,000 students on Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) released Mathematics and Science tests

Incorrect scores were issued to more than 500,000 students on Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) released Mathematics and Science tests.  The Texas Education Agency (TEA) issued false statements about several questions on which scoring mistakes were made.  Some TEA false statements were due to incompetence or dishonesty.  The TEA failed to correct any of the mistakes and has continued to propagate the mistakes and false claims without correction.  The State Board of Education also failed to correct any of the mistakes.
    Some TAKS questions about which the TEA issued false statements were reported on by The New York Times and Fort Worth Star-Telegram:
    "None Of the Above", by Lisa Guernsey, The New York Times, 24 April 2005,
    "Physics, testing and a frog", letter by Charles Reidl and letter by Mike Stepp, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 14 June 2003,
    "Ambiguous questions", letter, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 10 June 2003,
    "Disputed TAKS answers correct, state agency says", Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 7 June 2003,
    "Physicist challenges 2 TAKS answers", Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 6 June 2003.

Questions used to determine student scores on Spring 2005, Spring 2007, and Spring 2008 TAKS tests have not been released to the public.  This prevents public review of the questions and answers for appropriateness and correctness and denies opportunities for children, teachers, and others to learn from the tests.  All questions used to determine student scores should be released to the public promptly after every TAKS test.

Question 10, July 2004, Exit Level, TAKS Science test
The answer to this question cannot be determined, even roughly, from the given information.  The Texas Education Agency made the mistakes of giving credit for one of the answers and of not throwing out the question.

Question 11, Spring 2003, Grade 11, TAKS Science test
The Texas Education Agency made the mistakes of giving credit for an incorrect answer and of denying credit for a correct answer to this question.  The TEA would have Texans believe that more than 82% of the 187214 students who took the test chose a correct answer even though only 5% chose a correct answer.  That only 5% of Texas 11th-Graders chose a correct answer (and some students may simply have guessed) demonstrates a deficiency in basic physics education in Texas that should be corrected, not hidden.

Question 45, Spring 2003, Grade 11, TAKS Science test
All of the listed answers to this question are incorrect.  The Texas Education Agency made the mistakes of giving credit for one of the incorrect answers and of not throwing out the question.

Question 53, Spring 2003, Grade 11, TAKS Science test
There is a possibility that all of the listed answers to this question are incorrect, in which case the question should have been thrown out.

Question 50, Spring 2003, Grade 10, TAKS Science test
The Texas Education Agency made the mistake of denying credit for the only correct answer to this question.

Question 8, Spring 2003, Grade 10, TAKS Mathematics test
The Texas Education Agency gave credit for the correct answer to this question but made the mistakes of later giving credit for the three incorrect answers and for no answer.

Question 42, Spring 2003, Grade 9, TAKS Mathematics test
Two of the listed answers to this question are correct.  The Texas Education Agency made the mistake of denying credit for one of the two correct answers.

Question 13, Spring 2003, Grade 5, TAKS Science test
The correct answer to this question depends on when the question is asked.  When the test was administered, all of the listed answers were incorrect.  The Texas Education Agency made the mistakes of giving credit for an answer that was incorrect and of not throwing out the question.

Question 16, Spring 2003, Grade 5, TAKS Science test
Two of the listed answers to this question are correct.  The Texas Education Agency made the mistake of denying credit for one of the two correct answers.